Conformity Keeping Up With The Joneses
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Conformity shows a decreased sense of individuality and may also be seen as an idea of simplicity or keeping up with past tradition. bigger-is-better and a materially-satisfied-living are the main components to the value of conformity and keeping up with the Joneses.

People living in the Billings area are not known for being all the same, but if anything for their individualism. If you look around you can see some unusually colored houses, such as bright blue or purple, these being a sign of the person’s individual taste and not at all conformed with everyone else around them. You can also look at their yards to see another example of individuality, even if it is not a big one. Some people have flowers gardens and different decorations where as some people just have a plain yard of grass. If all the yards were an example of conformity they would have everything the same and be intended to look like they were the same.

Conformity is mainly an outward attitude and mainly based upon appearance, especially in the sense of keeping up with the Joneses. People feel the need to have the newest of whatever it may be to have the feeling of fitting in with the majority of the people around them.

With conformity we can not bring our own interests into light. When conformity is present newer ideas are hard to come by. We have to work together to get things done with in a community, and that is hard when there are no new ideas because the feeling of conformity is so great.
An idea of an era of conformist actions would be the US in the 1950’s. Rows of houses looked the same, the same flowers in the yard, and the mailboxes were even the same. Streets were designed so that when you went down them nothing stuck out, nothing was different. There was also an interlying sense of conformity in peoples’ actions. It was rare for someone to come out with a problem, just as depression, because it made you different and people were not used to being different.

The Conflict:

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